(RUB, Kramer)

Prof. Dr. Rebekka A. Klein

Professor of Systematic Theology

Contact

Chair of Systematic Theology
Faculty of Protestant Theology
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Universitätsstr. 150
44801 Bochum

rebekka.klein@ruhr-uni-bochum.de

Office


Tel.: +49234-32-28425

Fax: +49234-32-14026

oekumene@rub.de

Systematic Theology News

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"Sovereignty and Event" - New Book

More Information on the Book

 

Dr. Calvin D. Ullrich, research assistant (PostDoc) at the chair, will publish his dissertation in January 2021 in the series "Religion in Philosophy and Theology" at the publisher Mohr Siebeck. It is entitled "Sovereignty and Event. The Political in John D. Caputo's Radical Theology". With it, Dr. Ullrich presents a theological-political interpretation of the work of the philosopher John D. Caputo, which takes into account especially his late writings and, from these, sheds new light on Caputo's concern to deconstruct sovereignty.

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Workshop "Public Theology Deconstructed" 2021

 

From June, 14-15, 2021 the Chair of Systematic Theology/Ecumenics and Dogmatics in Bochum will host an international workshop on public theology, bringing together leading experts in this field from South Africa, Germany and the United States. The meeting is funded by German Research Foundation.

Keynote speaker of this workshop will be Prof. Dr. Miroslav Volf (Yale, USA).

Confirmed speakers include Johann-Albrecht Meylahn (Pretoria, South Africa), Jakub Urbaniak (Pretoria, South Africa), David Newheiser (Brisbane, Australia), Torsten Meireis (Berlin, Germany), Thomas Wabel (Bamberg, Germany), Luca Di Blasi (Bern, Switzerland), Christian Polke (Göttingen, Germany) and Rasmus Nagel (Heidelberg, Germany). Also requested for a lecture is Tinyiko Maluleke (Pretoria, South Africa).

Invitation from the Organizers:

Since the turn of the century, it has now become something of a banality to attempt to define or identify the enormously influential field known as ‘public theology.’ For some, the term gestures toward an apologetic for the place of religion or ‘church’ in secular society, and for others, it goes beyond by pointing to an active and creative engagement with a range of social, political, economic, and ecological issues. Due to the diversity of adherents as well as plurality of trajectories, the charge of tautology is often registered, since it seems all theology in the end is in some sense ‘public.’ Nonetheless, as many have noted, there are certainly common features which this mode of theological discourse assumes. It often considers itself as a contributor to the framework and institutions of secular-democracy, and therefore follows the assumptions which broadly define modern liberalism. With increasing clarity, however, the contradictions of this framework have been made manifest, along with resultant liberal-left identity proliferation and right-wing populist reactions. It is for this reason that public theology has come under pressure in recent years for its lack of prophetic criticism vis-à-vis the status quo of contemporary political and socio-economic centrism.

While a distinctive characteristic of public theology has always been to resist the privatization of religion, and thus could be said to occupy the new intellectual conditions of the ‘postsecular’, it remains questionable the extent to which these conditions have been self-critically examined. Can public theology continue to contribute meaningfully within the context of the shifts in Western democracies when it still assumes the purity of its discourse despite evidence to the contrary? With the resources of the latest developments in political and continental philosophy, this workshop suggests a ‘public theology deconstructed’, which is to say, that the exposure of public theology to its limits in light of new prevailing intellectual developments, does not spell the end of ‘public theology’, but may present the opportunity to re-define ist purpose and pose new directions for theological reflection.

Rebekka A. Klein, Calvin Ullrich  

 

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Second Workshop "Ecumenism on the Move" 2020

 

The second workshop of the series "Ecumenism on the Move. Research Perspectives in Ecumenical Theology" was held online this year as a writing workshop from 16-26 July 2020. Young scholars from all over Germany took part.

The following contributions could be discussed and commented on:

Stefan Dienstbeck: Ecumenical dialogue 2.0? Questions to the Methodology and Goals of Ecumenical Theology in the Face of New Challenges

Maria Hinsenkamp: The Pentecostal-Charismatic Movement as a Game Changer of Christianity and a Challenge for Ecumenism

Sung Kwon Kim: The Reception of 'Vernacular Cosmopolitanism' in Ecumenical Theology

Peter Schüz: Opportunities and Risks of an Ecumenism of Confessional Mentalities

Rasmus Nagel: Singular Catholicity. Remarks on the Relationship between Universality, Particularity and Singularity

Matthew Ryan Robinson: Ecumenical Studies as Transcultural Theological Research

The scientific results of the first and second workshop will be published next year in a conference proceeding edited by Prof. Dr. Rebekka A. Klein and Dr. Lisanne Teuchert.

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Conference Proceeding "In Need of a Master. Politics, Theology and Radical Democracy"

 

In 2021 the conference volume "In Need of A Master. Politics, Theology and Radical Democracy" will be published by De Gruyter with selected contributions of the interdisciplinary conference series of the chair on the relationship between political theology and new authoritarianism.

Contributors to the volume include John Milbank (Nottingham), Joseph Vogl (Berlin), Ino Augsberg (Kiel), Philipp Stoellger (Heidelberg), Clemens Pornschlegel (München), Dimitris Vardoulakis (Sidney), Daniel Weidner (Berlin), Florian Grosser (San Francisco), Günter Thomas (Bochum), Burkhard Liebsch (Bochum), Luca Di Blasi (Bern), Rebekka A. Klein (Bochum), Dominik Finkelde (München) und Rasmus Nagel (Heidelberg).

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Conference Proceeding "Being Christians Together"

 

In December 2020 the contributions of the 2018 conference "Being Christians Together. Potentials and Perspectives of Ecumenical Theology in the 21st Century" will be published in the series Dogmatics in Modernity by Mohr Siebeck.

Contributors to the volume edited by Prof. Dr. Rebekka Klein include Bassam Tibi (Göttingen), Perry Schmidt-Leukel (Münster), Ulrich H.J. Körtner (Wien), Risto Saarinen (Helsinki), Dorotha Sattler (Münster), Claudia Jahnel (Bochum), Marianne Moyaert (Amsterdam), Wolfgang Thönissen (Paderborn), Markus Mühling (Wuppertal), Stefan Dienstbeck (Straßburg), Annemarie Mayer (Leuven) und André Munzinger (Kiel).

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New Article in Zeitschrift f. Syst. Theologie 1/2020

 

In the Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie und Religionsphilosophie, issue 1/2020, the article "Das soziale Band der Religion. Von der Funktionalität religiösen Sozialkapitals zur Performanz einer Lebensform sui generis" by Prof. Dr. Rebekka A. Klein has been published.

The article examines the metaphor of a social bond in relation to religion, which has been used in social theory since ancient times. It accentuates the performativity of social bonds and cohesive forces and thus their cultural production. However, religion cannot simply be equated with cultural acts, as is often the case in liberal Protestant approaches and in concepts of public theology. As an alternative, therefore, the article seeks a dialogue with post-structuralist authors (Derrida, Nancy), in order to look for a reference from them to the open metaphor of the social bond (religion) and to the thesis of its performance.

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New Article in Zeitschr. f. Evang. Ethik 1/2020

 

The article "Diesseits der Nächstenliebe: Was heißt Helfen im Horizont der Lebensformen der Fürsorge" by Prof. Dr. Rebekka A. Klein was published in the Zeitschrift für Evangelische Ethik in issue 1/2020.

The ethical significance of altruistic helping is interpreted in this article from a new perspective by exploring the phenomenology of care. Care is not to be seen as an extraordinary moral action but rather as an ordinary form of life. It constitutes an ethical subjectivity characterized by vulnerability, mutual dependence and intimacy. Further, care is not universalistic but particularly orientated. It does not respond to the objective neediness or hardship of others but to the precarious and vulnerable position of a concrete human being. Thus, the article defends the view that a universalistic approach towards helping misses the central point which is to be seen in the fact that helping is not about benefitting the other but about building sustainable social relationships.